Whitby's Lane, Winsford, CW7 2LZ

The Acorn Preschool children have been full of the wonder of Bonfire night and fireworks, so we used this opportunity to develop their learning this week.

 

The week started with a bang when we enjoyed some time with the Samba-bamba-man as the whole school celebrated ‘Diversity Week’. Through this hands-on physical session, the children explored a variety of instruments and the sounds they can make, whilst exploring their own body movement to Samba rhythms. Most children loved this and anyone looking in could’ve been mistaken that they were in Rio de Janiero!

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To explore the theme of Bonfire Night, the children were given opportunities to talk about what they had seen and heard over the weekend. We explored more about fireworks, bonfires and Guy Fawkes. To build on this excitement, the children enjoyed many firework themed activities through their play, including large-scale firework drawing, marble firework pictures and we even closely observed cake firework sand sparklers! Finally, on Thursday, the children made breadstick sparklers – which were yummy!

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For our story of the week, we have been exploring ‘Rosie’s Walk’. This story is excellent for encouraging children’s understanding of positional language. We have also used this story to build on the children’s correct use of ‘he’ and ‘she’ when speaking to describe what they can see happening in the pictures. Many children find this difficult, but with some support to recognise the correct time to use these words, children can quickly pick it up. Talk with your child and make sure that you make it clear when you use she and he, helping them to link it to the person being male or female.

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Through this story, we have used the Talk for Writing approach to help the children learn the story with repetitive language (such as “But, the fox followed her”) and memorable actions. This also includes actions for specific story telling language – such as ‘Once upon a time’, ‘first’, ‘next’, after that’ and ‘finally’. These actions can be found if you type Talk for Writing actions into Youtube – you could practice these with your child to help them remember them. A story map also helps the children to remember the order of the events when they are orally retelling the story.

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We will continue to build on this story and start to imitate and make our own version next week.

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Stars of the day this week were Alissa, Miya, Ethyn and Amelia – well done to you all!